Mission Quotes: Johannes Verkuyl

As I read literature relating to Mission Studies and World Christianity, I intend to share short quotations, partly to highlight statements that seem to me to be thought-provoking and partly to highlight books and authors that readers may find interesting and useful.

The following quotation is from the Dutch missiologist, Johannes Verkuyl.

[M]issiology may never become a substitute for action and participation. God calls for participants and volunteers in his mission. In part, missiology’s goal is to become a ‘service station’ along the way. If study does not lead to participation, whether at home or abroad, missiology has lost her humble calling.’

Johannes Verkuyl, Contemporary Missiology: An Introduction (Translated and edited by Dale Cooper; Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1978), 6.

Readers who would like to read further in Mission Studies might wish to look at this Bibliography of Mission Studies and World Christianity.

Advertisements

Mission Quotes: Cape Town Commitment

As I read literature relating to Mission Studies and World Christianity, I intend to share short quotations, partly to highlight statements that seem to me to be thought-provoking and partly to highlight books and authors that readers may find interesting and useful.

The following quotation is the opening paragraph of Part 1 of the Cape Town Commitment, an extensive document produced by the Lausanne Movement. This document is freely available online and should be read by everyone who is committed to the task of mission.

1. We love because God first loved us

The mission of God flows from the love of God. The mission of God’s people flows from our love for God and for all that God loves. World evangelization is the outflow of God’s love to us and through us. We affirm the primacy of God’s grace and we then respond to that grace by faith, demonstrated through the obedience of love. We love because God first loved us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.

Readers who would like to read further in Mission Studies might wish to look at this Bibliography of Mission Studies and World Christianity.

Mission Quotes: Andrew F. Walls

Walls Crossing Cultural Frontiers

As I read literature relating to Mission Studies and World Christianity, I intend to share short quotations, partly to highlight statements that seem to me to be thought-provoking and partly to highlight books and authors that readers may find interesting and useful.

Appropriately, my first quotation comes from Andrew F. Walls, widely recognised as one of the most important figures in the academic study of mission and World Christianity. I expect I will share further quotations from Walls before long! In a paper entitled, ‘The Future of Missiology–Missiology as Vocation’, Walls writes,

‘Missiologists are the magpies of the academic world; they invade the scholarly territory of their neighbors and steal their topics . . . we invade the biblical field, the theological field, the historical field, and the practical field in the name of the study of mission.’

[Andrew F. Walls, Crossing Cultural Frontiers: Studies in the History of World Christianity. (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2017), 259.]

At the close of the same paper, Walls asks,

‘Is there any more exciting vocation at the present time than missiology?’

[Andrew F. Walls, Crossing Cultural Frontiers: Studies in the History of World Christianity. (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2017), 266.]

The implied answer to his rhetorical question is clear. I hope that many readers of this post discover this for themselves!

Readers who would like to read further in Mission Studies might wish to look at this Bibliography of Mission Studies and World Christianity.

Related posts:

Andrew Walls, Mission, and World Christianity

Global Theology – Lectures by Escobar, Sanneh, Walls, and others

Christian Mission in the Modern World, by John Stott. Updated and Expanded by Chris Wright.

John Stott’s book, Christian Mission in the Modern World, was first published in 1975. It was the published form of a series of lectures on key terms relating to Christian mission, namely, ‘mission’, ‘evangelism’, ‘dialogue’, ‘salvation’, and ‘conversion’. Forty years later, in 2015, this new edition appeared with significant additional material written by Chris Wright. The result is a fascinating volume that will be of value to anyone who wishes to develop their thinking about Christian mission.

What does this book offer the reader?

First, and fundamentally, the book offers the benefits of Stott’s characteristically clear, careful teaching on some crucial theological words and concepts, with application to the tasks of the church in the modern world. Typically, his discussions are steeped in the biblical texts, but they also engage with important trends in modern thought in an incisive yet irenic manner.

Secondly, the new edition introduces the contribution of Chris Wright, uniquely qualified for the task as a long-term friend, colleague, and collaborator of Stott, as well as a significant contributor to mission studies in his own right. In his preface, Wright indicates that he made several contributions to the work. With respect to Stott’s chapters, he has lightly edited them to remove references to outdated debates and also to use gender-inclusive language. More significantly, after each of Stott’s chapters, Wright provides a substantial reflection on the chapter, drawing attention to portions of Stott’s later books where he writes at greater length on certain topics; highlighting and elaborating on points that have proved important in missiology since Stott wrote in the mid-nineteen-seventies; and providing additional bibliographical information (in the endnotes). It is evident from these chapters that Wright regards Stott’s work with great appreciation and respect, as one who reflects on the words of a deeply-valued mentor. Yet Wright does not hesitate to identify occasional points where he differs to some extent with Stott’s statements. I found these chapters fascinating as a testimony to a long friendship that involved both fundamental agreement and honest but respectful conversation about differences.

Thirdly, this edition serves as a useful introduction to the Lausanne Movement (to which the book is dedicated) and its documents. While this short book is not intended to be a full introduction to the Lausanne Movement, Stott’s chapters were first published shortly after the Lausanne Congress for World Evangelization (1974) and Stott quotes from the Lausanne Covenant, of which he was a significant author, on a number of occasions. Similarly, Chris Wright was a key figure in the drafting of the Cape Town Commitment (2010), associated with the most recent Lausanne Movement gathering in South Africa, and he quotes from it frequently in his chapters. These documents deserve to be more widely known, read and discussed. This book will perhaps introduce them to some readers.

For all these reasons, this new edition of a classic book is very welcome. This book would serve as a helpful introduction to mission studies for general Christian readers, but all readers will benefit from listening to this engagement between two gifted leaders in world mission.

[I am grateful to IVP for a free review copy of this book.]

MTh in Missiology (subject to validation)

Christians in the UK and throughout the world need, more than ever, a clear understanding of what ‘mission’ is, and instruction and training in how to engage effectively in that mission. Edinburgh Theological Seminary intends to offer a taught MTh in Missiology (subject to validation by the University of Glasgow) in 2018-19. We would be delighted to hear from anyone holding appropriate qualifications who would like to apply for this degree programme. You can find the relevant details on the ETS web site.

We would love to have you study with us!

The ESV Bible Expository Commentary (forthcoming)

I am delighted to see for the first time tonight the announcement of the twelve-volume ESV Bible Expository Commentary, with selected volumes now available for pre-order. I was honoured to be invited to contribute the commentaries on Colossians and Philemon (included in Volume 11).

Details of individual volumes can be found at the following links (currently only volumes 7, 11 and 12 are listed on the Crossway web site and on Amazon):

Volume 7

Volume 11

Volume 12

I am grateful to the editors and publisher for the privilege of contributing to this series. I look forward eagerly to seeing the physical book in due course.

Logos Free Book of the Month, January 2018

If you use Logos software, be sure to pick up the Free Book of the Month for January. This month you can get Todd Wilson’s expository commentary on Galatians in the Preaching the Word series free of charge. If you wish to pay a couple of dollars more, you can have a volume by Ray Ortlund from the same series too. There is also an offer on a three volume set of Martyn Lloyd-Jones’s sermons on Acts 1-8 Today is your last opportunity for these offers, so don’t miss out! And look out for another offer tomorrow! If you don’t already have the Logos Basic software so that you can read these books, you can download it completely free here.